The Storj Labs Blog

When the tech industry began the transition to cloud-based resource provisioning, the attack/security vectors in which DevOps and CISOs focus on to protect their resources, shifted along with it. Suddenly, protecting users’ data required a fundamentally new approach to containing resources. Rather than simply “defending the perimeter” (through ownership of network infrastructure, firewalls, NICs etc.) the model shifted to an identity-based approach to control access to systems and resources.
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Developers have been clamoring for a decentralized storage solution for pinning data on IPFS— and the Storj community has answered the call with storjipfs.com. The IPFS protocol is popular with decentralized app developers as a way to address content from its hash output. While it’s merely a way to address files across a DHT (or network of Kademlia nodes), it’s usually deployed with Amazon S3 or local storage on the backend.
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Since the start of the new year, our team here at Storj Labs has made major progress toward the production launch of the V3 network. In February, we launched the V3 Explorer alpha release, which enabled anyone with underutilized hardware or bandwidth resources to join the Storj network and start earning STORJ token in exchange for their contributions. Since the Explorer launch, we have been letting small groups of storage node operators onto the network each day.
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Storj is a decentralized object storage network where data is encrypted client-side, broken into pieces, erasure coded, and spread across a network of fault-tolerant nodes. The goal for Storj’s V3 network is to provide developers with an object storage solution that is more secure, economical and performant than existing cloud storage options. This is made possible through protocol features like concurrency, parallelism, client-side encryption, and erasure coding (Reed-Solomon). The Storj test network (storj-sim) enables you to run all the components of the Storj platform (Satellite, Uplink client, and storage nodes) and test them on your local machine.
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